Tools for generating lists of integers in lexicographic order

IMPORTANT NOTE (2009/02): The internal functions in this file will be deprecated soon. Please only use them through IntegerListsLex.

AUTHORS:

  • Mike Hansen
  • Travis Scrimshaw (2012-05-12): Fixed errors when returning None from first. Added checks to make sure max_slope is satisfied.
  • Travis Scrimshaw (2012-10-29): Made IntegerListsLex into a parent with the element class IntegerListsLexElement.
class sage.combinat.integer_list.IntegerListsLex(n, length=None, min_length=0, max_length=inf, floor=None, ceiling=None, min_part=0, max_part=inf, min_slope=-inf, max_slope=inf, name=None, element_constructor=None, element_class=None, global_options=None)

Bases: sage.structure.parent.Parent

A combinatorial class \(C\) for integer lists satisfying certain sum, length, upper/lower bound and regularity constraints. The purpose of this tool is mostly to provide a Constant Amortized Time iterator through those lists, in lexicographic order.

INPUT:

  • n – a non negative integer
  • min_length – a non negative integer
  • max_length – an integer or \(\infty\)
  • length – an integer; overrides min_length and max_length if specified
  • floor – a function \(f\) (or list); defaults to lambda i: 0
  • ceiling – a function \(f\) (or list); defaults to lambda i: infinity
  • min_slope – an integer or \(-\infty\); defaults to \(-\infty\)
  • max_slope – an integer or \(+\infty\); defaults to \(+\infty\)

An integer list is a list \(l\) of nonnegative integers, its parts. The length of \(l\) is the number of its parts; the sum of \(l\) is the sum of its parts.

Note

Two valid integer lists are considered equivalent if they only differ by trailing zeroes. In this case, only the list with the least number of trailing zeroes will be produced.

The constraints on the lists are as follow:

  • Sum: \(sum(l) == n\)
  • Length: min_length <= len(l) <= max_length
  • Lower and upper bounds: floor(i) <= l[i] <= ceiling(i), for i from 0 to len(l)
  • Regularity condition: minSlope <= l[i+1]-l[i] <= maxSlope, for i from 0 to len(l)-1

This is a generic low level tool. The interface has been designed with efficiency in mind. It is subject to incompatible changes in the future. More user friendly interfaces are provided by high level tools like Partitions or Compositions.

EXAMPLES:

We create the combinatorial class of lists of length 3 and sum 2:

sage: C = IntegerListsLex(2, length=3)
sage: C
Integer lists of sum 2 satisfying certain constraints
sage: C.cardinality()
6
sage: [p for p in C]
[[2, 0, 0], [1, 1, 0], [1, 0, 1], [0, 2, 0], [0, 1, 1], [0, 0, 2]]

sage: [2, 0, 0] in C
True
sage: [2, 0, 1] in C
False
sage: "a" in C
False
sage: ["a"] in C
False

sage: C.first()
[2, 0, 0]

One can specify lower and upper bound on each part:

sage: list(IntegerListsLex(5, length = 3, floor = [1,2,0], ceiling = [3,2,3]))
[[3, 2, 0], [2, 2, 1], [1, 2, 2]]

Using the slope condition, one can generate integer partitions (but see sage.combinat.partition.Partitions):

sage: list(IntegerListsLex(4, max_slope=0))
[[4], [3, 1], [2, 2], [2, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1]]

This is the list of all partitions of \(7\) with parts at least \(2\):

sage: list(IntegerListsLex(7, max_slope = 0, min_part = 2))
[[7], [5, 2], [4, 3], [3, 2, 2]]

This is the list of all partitions of \(5\) and length at most 3 which are bounded below by [2,1,1]:

sage: list(IntegerListsLex(5, max_slope = 0, max_length = 3, floor = [2,1,1]))
[[5], [4, 1], [3, 2], [3, 1, 1], [2, 2, 1]]

Note that [5] is considered valid, because the lower bound constraint only apply to existing positions in the list. To obtain instead the partitions containing [2,1,1], one need to use min_length:

sage: list(IntegerListsLex(5, max_slope = 0, min_length = 3, max_length = 3, floor = [2,1,1]))
[[3, 1, 1], [2, 2, 1]]

This is the list of all partitions of \(5\) which are contained in [3,2,2]:

sage: list(IntegerListsLex(5, max_slope = 0, max_length = 3, ceiling = [3,2,2]))
[[3, 2], [3, 1, 1], [2, 2, 1]]

This is the list of all compositions of \(4\) (but see Compositions):

sage: list(IntegerListsLex(4, min_part = 1))
[[4], [3, 1], [2, 2], [2, 1, 1], [1, 3], [1, 2, 1], [1, 1, 2], [1, 1, 1, 1]]

This is the list of all integer vectors of sum \(4\) and length \(3\):

sage: list(IntegerListsLex(4, length = 3))
[[4, 0, 0], [3, 1, 0], [3, 0, 1], [2, 2, 0], [2, 1, 1], [2, 0, 2], [1, 3, 0], [1, 2, 1], [1, 1, 2], [1, 0, 3], [0, 4, 0], [0, 3, 1], [0, 2, 2], [0, 1, 3], [0, 0, 4]]

There are all the lists of sum 4 and length 4 such that l[i] <= i:

sage: list(IntegerListsLex(4, length=4, ceiling=lambda i: i))
[[0, 1, 2, 1], [0, 1, 1, 2], [0, 1, 0, 3], [0, 0, 2, 2], [0, 0, 1, 3]]

This is the list of all monomials of degree \(4\) which divide the monomial \(x^3y^1z^2\) (a monomial being identified with its exponent vector):

sage: R.<x,y,z> = QQ[]
sage: m = [3,1,2]
sage: def term(exponents):
...       return x^exponents[0] * y^exponents[1] * z^exponents[2]
...
sage: list( IntegerListsLex(4, length = len(m), ceiling = m, element_constructor = term) )
[x^3*y, x^3*z, x^2*y*z, x^2*z^2, x*y*z^2]

Note the use of the element_constructor feature.

In general, the complexity of the iteration algorithm is constant time amortized for each integer list produced. There is one degenerate case though where the algorithm may run forever without producing anything. If max_length is \(+\infty\) and max_slope \(>0\), testing whether there exists a valid integer list of sum \(n\) may be only semi-decidable. In the following example, the algorithm will enter an infinite loop, because it needs to decide whether \(ceiling(i)\) is nonzero for some \(i\):

sage: list( IntegerListsLex(1, ceiling = lambda i: 0) ) # todo: not implemented

Note

Caveat: counting is done by brute force generation. In some special cases, it would be possible to do better by counting techniques for integral point in polytopes.

Note

Caveat: with the current implementation, the constraints should satisfy the following conditions:

  • The upper and lower bounds themselves should satisfy the slope constraints.
  • The maximal and minimal slopes values should not be equal.
  • The maximal and minimal part values should not be equal.

Those conditions are not checked by the algorithm, and the result may be completely incorrect if they are not satisfied:

In the following example, the slope condition is not satisfied by the upper bound on the parts, and [3,3] is erroneously included in the result:

sage: list(IntegerListsLex(6, max_part=3,max_slope=-1))
[[3, 3], [3, 2, 1]]

With some work, this could be fixed without affecting the overall complexity and efficiency. Also, the generation algorithm could be extended to deal with non-constant slope constraints and with negative parts, as well as to accept a range parameter instead of a single integer for the sum \(n\) of the lists (the later was readily implemented in MuPAD-Combinat). Encouragements, suggestions, and help are welcome.

TESTS:

sage: g = lambda x: lambda i: x
sage: list(IntegerListsLex(0, floor = g(1), min_slope = 0))
[[]]
sage: list(IntegerListsLex(0, floor = g(1), min_slope = 0, max_slope = 0))
[[]]
sage: list(IntegerListsLex(0, max_length=0, floor = g(1), min_slope = 0, max_slope = 0))
[[]]
sage: list(IntegerListsLex(0, max_length=0, floor = g(0), min_slope = 0, max_slope = 0))
[[]]
sage: list(IntegerListsLex(0, min_part = 1, min_slope = 0))
[[]]
sage: list(IntegerListsLex(1, min_part = 1, min_slope = 0))
[[1]]
sage: list(IntegerListsLex(0, min_length = 1, min_part = 1, min_slope = 0))
[]
sage: list(IntegerListsLex(0, min_length = 1, min_slope = 0))
[[0]]
sage: list(IntegerListsLex(3, max_length=2, ))
[[3], [2, 1], [1, 2], [0, 3]]
sage: partitions = {"min_part": 1, "max_slope": 0}
sage: partitions_min_2 = {"floor": g(2), "max_slope": 0}
sage: compositions = {"min_part": 1}
sage: integer_vectors = lambda l: {"length": l}
sage: lower_monomials = lambda c: {"length": c, "floor": lambda i: c[i]}
sage: upper_monomials = lambda c: {"length": c, "ceiling": lambda i: c[i]}
sage: constraints = { "min_part":1, "min_slope": -1, "max_slope": 0}
sage: list(IntegerListsLex(6, **partitions))
[[6],
 [5, 1],
 [4, 2],
 [4, 1, 1],
 [3, 3],
 [3, 2, 1],
 [3, 1, 1, 1],
 [2, 2, 2],
 [2, 2, 1, 1],
 [2, 1, 1, 1, 1],
 [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]]
sage: list(IntegerListsLex(6, **constraints))
[[6],
 [3, 3],
 [3, 2, 1],
 [2, 2, 2],
 [2, 2, 1, 1],
 [2, 1, 1, 1, 1],
 [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]]
sage: list(IntegerListsLex(1, **partitions_min_2))
[]
sage: list(IntegerListsLex(2, **partitions_min_2))
[[2]]
sage: list(IntegerListsLex(3, **partitions_min_2))
[[3]]
sage: list(IntegerListsLex(4, **partitions_min_2))
[[4], [2, 2]]
sage: list(IntegerListsLex(5, **partitions_min_2))
[[5], [3, 2]]
sage: list(IntegerListsLex(6, **partitions_min_2))
[[6], [4, 2], [3, 3], [2, 2, 2]]
sage: list(IntegerListsLex(7, **partitions_min_2))
[[7], [5, 2], [4, 3], [3, 2, 2]]
sage: list(IntegerListsLex(9, **partitions_min_2))
[[9], [7, 2], [6, 3], [5, 4], [5, 2, 2], [4, 3, 2], [3, 3, 3], [3, 2, 2, 2]]
sage: list(IntegerListsLex(10, **partitions_min_2))
[[10],
 [8, 2],
 [7, 3],
 [6, 4],
 [6, 2, 2],
 [5, 5],
 [5, 3, 2],
 [4, 4, 2],
 [4, 3, 3],
 [4, 2, 2, 2],
 [3, 3, 2, 2],
 [2, 2, 2, 2, 2]]
sage: list(IntegerListsLex(4, **compositions))
[[4], [3, 1], [2, 2], [2, 1, 1], [1, 3], [1, 2, 1], [1, 1, 2], [1, 1, 1, 1]]
sage: list(IntegerListsLex(6, min_length=1, floor=[7]))
[]
Element

alias of IntegerListsLexElement

build_args()

Returns a list of arguments that can be passed into the pre-existing first, next, is_a, ... functions in this module.

n is currently not included in this list.

EXAMPLES:

sage: C = IntegerListsLex(2, length=3)
sage: C.build_args()
[3,
 3,
 <function <lambda> at 0x...>,
 <function <lambda> at 0x...>,
 -inf,
 inf]
ceiling(i)

Returns the maximum part that can appear in the \(i^{th}\) position in any list produced.

EXAMPLES:

sage: C = IntegerListsLex(4, length=2, max_part=3)
sage: C.ceiling(0)
3
sage: C = IntegerListsLex(4, length=2, ceiling=[3,2])
sage: C.ceiling(0)
3
sage: C.ceiling(1)
2
count()

Default brute force implementation of count by iteration through all the objects.

Note that this skips the call to _element_constructor, unlike the default implementation.

Todo

Do the iteration in place to save on copying time

EXAMPLES:

sage: C = IntegerListsLex(2, length=3)
sage: C.cardinality() == C.count()
True
first()

Returns the lexicographically maximal element in self.

EXAMPLES:

sage: C = IntegerListsLex(2, length=3)
sage: C.first()
[2, 0, 0]
floor(i)

Returns the minimum part that can appear at the \(i^{th}\) position of any list produced.

EXAMPLES:

sage: C = IntegerListsLex(4, length=2, min_part=1)
sage: C.floor(0)
1
sage: C = IntegerListsLex(4, length=2, floor=[1,2])
sage: C.floor(0)
1
sage: C.floor(1)
2
class sage.combinat.integer_list.IntegerListsLexElement

Bases: sage.structure.list_clone.ClonableArray

Element class for IntegerListsLex.

check()

Check to make sure this is a valid element in its IntegerListsLex parent.

Todo

Placeholder. Implement a proper check.

EXAMPLES:

sage: C = IntegerListsLex(4)
sage: C([4]).check()
True
sage.combinat.integer_list.comp2ceil(c, min_slope, max_slope)

Given a composition, returns the lowest regular function N->N below it.

EXAMPLES:

sage: from sage.combinat.integer_list import comp2ceil
sage: f = comp2ceil([2, 1, 1],-1,0)
sage: [f(i) for i in range(10)]
[2, 1, 1, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]
sage.combinat.integer_list.comp2floor(f, min_slope, max_slope)

Given a composition, returns the lowest regular function N->N above it.

EXAMPLES:

sage: from sage.combinat.integer_list import comp2floor
sage: f = comp2floor([2, 1, 1],-1,0)
sage: [f(i) for i in range(10)]
[2, 1, 1, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]
sage.combinat.integer_list.first(n, min_length, max_length, floor, ceiling, min_slope, max_slope)

Returns the lexicographically smallest valid composition of \(n\) satisfying the conditions.

Warning

INTERNAL FUNCTION! DO NOT USE DIRECTLY!

Todo

Move this into Cython.

Preconditions:

  • minslope < maxslope
  • floor and ceiling need to satisfy the slope constraints, e.g. be obtained fromcomp2floor or comp2ceil
  • floor must be below ceiling to ensure the existence a valid composition

TESTS:

sage: import sage.combinat.integer_list as integer_list
sage: f = lambda l: lambda i: l[i-1]
sage: f([0,1,2,3,4,5])(1)
0
sage: integer_list.first(12, 4, 4, f([0,0,0,0]), f([4,4,4,4]), -1, 1)
[4, 3, 3, 2]
sage: integer_list.first(36, 9, 9, f([3,3,3,2,1,1,0,0,0]), f([7,6,5,5,5,5,5,4,4]), -1, 1)
[7, 6, 5, 5, 4, 3, 3, 2, 1]
sage: integer_list.first(25, 9, 9, f([3,3,3,2,1,1,0,0,0]), f([7,6,5,5,5,5,5,4,4]), -2, 1)
[7, 6, 5, 4, 2, 1, 0, 0, 0]
sage: integer_list.first(36, 9, 9, f([3,3,3,2,1,4,2,0,0]), f([7,6,5,5,5,5,5,4,4]), -2, 1)
[7, 6, 5, 5, 5, 4, 3, 1, 0]
sage.combinat.integer_list.is_a(comp, min_length, max_length, floor, ceiling, min_slope, max_slope)

Returns True if comp meets the constraints imposed by the arguments.

Warning

INTERNAL FUNCTION! DO NOT USE DIRECTLY!

EXAMPLES:

sage: from sage.combinat.integer_list import is_a
sage: IV = IntegerVectors(2,3,min_slope=0)
sage: params = IV._parameters()
sage: all([is_a(iv, *params) for iv in IV])
True
sage.combinat.integer_list.iterator(n, min_length, max_length, floor, ceiling, min_slope, max_slope)

Warning

INTERNAL FUNCTION! DO NOT USE DIRECTLY!

EXAMPLES:

sage: from sage.combinat.integer_list import iterator
sage: IV = IntegerVectors(2,3,min_slope=0)
sage: params = IV._parameters()
sage: list(iterator(2,*params))
[[0, 1, 1], [0, 0, 2]]
sage.combinat.integer_list.list(n, min_length, max_length, floor, ceiling, min_slope, max_slope)

Warning

THIS FUNCTION IS DEPRECATED! Use IntegersListsLex(...) instead.

EXAMPLES:

sage: import sage.combinat.integer_list as integer_list
sage: g = lambda x: lambda i: x
sage: integer_list.list(0,0,infinity,g(1),g(infinity),0,infinity)
[[]]
sage: integer_list.list(0,0,infinity,g(1),g(infinity),0,0)
[[]]
sage: integer_list.list(0, 0, 0, g(1), g(infinity), 0, 0)
[[]]
sage: integer_list.list(0, 0, 0, g(0), g(infinity), 0, 0)
[[]]
sage: integer_list.list(0, 0, infinity, g(1), g(infinity), 0, infinity)
[[]]
sage: integer_list.list(1, 0, infinity, g(1), g(infinity), 0, infinity)
[[1]]
sage: integer_list.list(0, 1, infinity, g(1), g(infinity), 0, infinity)
[]
sage: integer_list.list(0, 1, infinity, g(0), g(infinity), 0, infinity)
[[0]]
sage: integer_list.list(3, 0, 2, g(0), g(infinity), -infinity, infinity)
[[3], [2, 1], [1, 2], [0, 3]]
sage: partitions = (0, infinity, g(0), g(infinity), -infinity, 0)
sage: partitions_min_2 = (0, infinity, g(2), g(infinity), -infinity, 0)
sage: compositions = (0, infinity, g(1), g(infinity), -infinity, infinity)
sage: integer_vectors = lambda l: (l, l, g(0), g(infinity), -infinity, infinity)
sage: lower_monomials = lambda c: (len(c), len(c), g(0), lambda i: c[i], -infinity, infinity)
sage: upper_monomials = lambda c: (len(c), len(c), g(0), lambda i: c[i], -infinity, infinity)
sage: constraints = (0, infinity, g(1), g(infinity), -1, 0)
sage: integer_list.list(6, *partitions)
[[6],
 [5, 1],
 [4, 2],
 [4, 1, 1],
 [3, 3],
 [3, 2, 1],
 [3, 1, 1, 1],
 [2, 2, 2],
 [2, 2, 1, 1],
 [2, 1, 1, 1, 1],
 [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]]
sage: integer_list.list(6, *constraints)
[[6],
 [3, 3],
 [3, 2, 1],
 [2, 2, 2],
 [2, 2, 1, 1],
 [2, 1, 1, 1, 1],
 [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]]
sage: integer_list.list(1, *partitions_min_2)
[]
sage: integer_list.list(2, *partitions_min_2)
[[2]]
sage: integer_list.list(3, *partitions_min_2)
[[3]]
sage: integer_list.list(4, *partitions_min_2)
[[4], [2, 2]]
sage: integer_list.list(5, *partitions_min_2)
[[5], [3, 2]]
sage: integer_list.list(6, *partitions_min_2)
[[6], [4, 2], [3, 3], [2, 2, 2]]
sage: integer_list.list(7, *partitions_min_2)
[[7], [5, 2], [4, 3], [3, 2, 2]]
sage: integer_list.list(9, *partitions_min_2)
[[9], [7, 2], [6, 3], [5, 4], [5, 2, 2], [4, 3, 2], [3, 3, 3], [3, 2, 2, 2]]
sage: integer_list.list(10, *partitions_min_2)
[[10],
 [8, 2],
 [7, 3],
 [6, 4],
 [6, 2, 2],
 [5, 5],
 [5, 3, 2],
 [4, 4, 2],
 [4, 3, 3],
 [4, 2, 2, 2],
 [3, 3, 2, 2],
 [2, 2, 2, 2, 2]]
sage: integer_list.list(4, *compositions)
[[4], [3, 1], [2, 2], [2, 1, 1], [1, 3], [1, 2, 1], [1, 1, 2], [1, 1, 1, 1]]
sage.combinat.integer_list.lower_regular(comp, min_slope, max_slope)

Returns the uppest regular composition below comp

TESTS:

sage: import sage.combinat.integer_list as integer_list
sage: integer_list.lower_regular([4,2,6], -1, 1)
[3, 2, 3]
sage: integer_list.lower_regular([4,2,6], -1, infinity)
[3, 2, 6]
sage: integer_list.lower_regular([1,4,2], -1, 1)
[1, 2, 2]
sage: integer_list.lower_regular([4,2,6,3,7], -2, 1)
[4, 2, 3, 3, 4]
sage: integer_list.lower_regular([4,2,infinity,3,7], -2, 1)
[4, 2, 3, 3, 4]
sage: integer_list.lower_regular([1, infinity, 2], -1, 1)
[1, 2, 2]
sage: integer_list.lower_regular([infinity, 4, 2], -1, 1)
[4, 3, 2]
sage.combinat.integer_list.next(comp, min_length, max_length, floor, ceiling, min_slope, max_slope)

Returns the next integer list after comp that satisfies the constraints.

Warning

INTERNAL FUNCTION! DO NOT USE DIRECTLY!

EXAMPLES:

sage: from sage.combinat.integer_list import next
sage: IV = IntegerVectors(2,3,min_slope=0)
sage: params = IV._parameters()
sage: next([0,1,1], *params)
[0, 0, 2]
sage.combinat.integer_list.rightmost_pivot(comp, min_length, max_length, floor, ceiling, min_slope, max_slope)

TESTS:

sage: import sage.combinat.integer_list as integer_list
sage: f = lambda l: lambda i: l[i-1]
sage: integer_list.rightmost_pivot([7,6,5,5,4,3,3,2,1], 9, 9, f([3,3,3,2,1,1,0,0,0]), f([7,6,5,5,5,5,5,4,4]), -1, 0)
[7, 2]
sage: integer_list.rightmost_pivot([7,6,5,5,4,3,3,2,1], 9, 9,f([3,3,3,2,1,1,0,0,0]), f([7,6,5,5,5,5,5,4,4]), -2, 0)
[7, 1]
sage: integer_list.rightmost_pivot([7,6,5,5,4,3,3,2,1], 9, 9,f([3,3,3,2,1,1,0,0,0]), f([7,6,5,5,5,5,5,4,4]), -2, 4)
[8, 1]
sage: integer_list.rightmost_pivot([7,6,5,5,4,3,3,2,1], 9, 9,f([3,3,3,2,1,1,0,0,0]), f([7,6,5,5,5,5,5,4,4]), -2, 1)
[8, 1]
sage: integer_list.rightmost_pivot([7,6,5,5,5,5,5,4,4], 9, 9,f([3,3,3,2,1,1,0,0,0]), f([7,6,5,5,5,5,5,4,4]), -2, 1)
sage: integer_list.rightmost_pivot([3,3,3,2,1,1,0,0,0], 9, 9,f([3,3,3,2,1,1,0,0,0]), f([7,6,5,5,5,5,5,4,4]), -2, 1)
sage: g = lambda x: lambda i: x
sage: integer_list.rightmost_pivot([1],1,1,g(0),g(2),-10, 10)
sage: integer_list.rightmost_pivot([1,2],2,2,g(0),g(2),-10, 10)
sage: integer_list.rightmost_pivot([1,2],2,2,g(1),g(2), -10, 10)
sage: integer_list.rightmost_pivot([1,2],2,3,g(1),g(2), -10, 10)
[2, 1]
sage: integer_list.rightmost_pivot([2,2],2,3,g(2),g(2),-10, 10)
sage: integer_list.rightmost_pivot([2,3],2,3,g(2),g(2),-10,+10)
sage: integer_list.rightmost_pivot([3,2],2,3,g(2),g(2),-10,+10)
sage: integer_list.rightmost_pivot([3,3],2,3,g(2),g(2),-10,+10)
[1, 2]
sage: integer_list.rightmost_pivot([6],1,3,g(0),g(6),-1,0)
[1, 0]
sage: integer_list.rightmost_pivot([6],1,3,g(0),g(6),-2,0)
[1, 0]
sage: integer_list.rightmost_pivot([7,9,8,7],1,5,g(0),g(10),-1,10)
[2, 6]
sage: integer_list.rightmost_pivot([7,9,8,7],1,5,g(5),g(10),-10,10)
[3, 5]
sage: integer_list.rightmost_pivot([7,9,8,7],1,5,g(5),g(10),-1,10)
[2, 6]
sage: integer_list.rightmost_pivot([7,9,8,7],1,5,g(4),g(10),-2,10)
[3, 7]
sage: integer_list.rightmost_pivot([9,8,7],1,4,g(4),g(10),-2,0)
[1, 4]
sage: integer_list.rightmost_pivot([1,3],1,5,lambda i: i,g(10),-10,10)
sage: integer_list.rightmost_pivot([1,4],1,5,lambda i: i,g(10),-10,10)
sage: integer_list.rightmost_pivot([2,4],1,5,lambda i: i,g(10),-10,10)
[1, 1]
sage.combinat.integer_list.upper_bound(min_length, max_length, floor, ceiling, min_slope, max_slope)

Compute a coarse upper bound on the size of a vector satisfying the constraints.

TESTS:

sage: import sage.combinat.integer_list as integer_list
sage: f = lambda x: lambda i: x
sage: integer_list.upper_bound(0,4,f(0), f(1),-infinity,infinity)
4
sage: integer_list.upper_bound(0, infinity, f(0), f(1), -infinity, infinity)
inf
sage: integer_list.upper_bound(0, infinity, f(0), f(1), -infinity, -1)
1
sage: integer_list.upper_bound(0, infinity, f(0), f(5), -infinity, -1)
15
sage: integer_list.upper_bound(0, infinity, f(0), f(5), -infinity, -2)
9
sage.combinat.integer_list.upper_regular(comp, min_slope, max_slope)

Return the uppest regular composition above comp.

TESTS:

sage: import sage.combinat.integer_list as integer_list
sage: integer_list.upper_regular([4,2,6],-1,1)
[4, 5, 6]
sage: integer_list.upper_regular([4,2,6],-2, 1)
[4, 5, 6]
sage: integer_list.upper_regular([4,2,6,3,7],-2, 1)
[4, 5, 6, 6, 7]
sage: integer_list.upper_regular([4,2,6,1], -2, 1)
[4, 5, 6, 4]

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