Fast compiled graphs

Fast compiled graphs

This is a Cython implementation of the base class for sparse and dense graphs in Sage. It is not intended for use on its own. Specific graph types should extend this base class and implement missing functionalities. Whenever possible, specific methods should also be overridden with implementations that suit the graph type under consideration.

Data structure

The class CGraph maintains the following variables:

  • cdef int num_verts
  • cdef int num_arcs
  • cdef int *in_degrees
  • cdef int *out_degrees
  • cdef bitset_t active_vertices

The bitset active_vertices is a list of all available vertices for use, but only the ones which are set are considered to actually be in the graph. The variables num_verts and num_arcs are self-explanatory. Note that num_verts is the number of bits set in active_vertices, not the full length of the bitset. The arrays in_degrees and out_degrees are of the same length as the bitset.

For more information about active vertices, see the documentation for the method realloc.

class sage.graphs.base.c_graph.CGraph

Bases: object

Compiled sparse and dense graphs.

add_arc(u, v)

Add the given arc to this graph.

INPUT:

  • u – integer; the tail of an arc.
  • v – integer; the head of an arc.

OUTPUT:

  • Raise NotImplementedError. This method is not implemented at the CGraph level. A child class should provide a suitable implementation.

See also

  • add_arcadd_arc method for sparse graphs.
  • add_arcadd_arc method for dense graphs.

EXAMPLE:

sage: from sage.graphs.base.c_graph import CGraph
sage: G = CGraph()
sage: G.add_arc(0, 1)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
NotImplementedError
add_vertex(k=-1)

Adds vertex k to the graph.

INPUT:

  • k – nonnegative integer or -1 (default: -1). If \(k = -1\), a new vertex is added and the integer used is returned. That is, for \(k = -1\), this function will find the first available vertex that is not in self and add that vertex to this graph.

OUTPUT:

  • -1 – indicates that no vertex was added because the current allocation is already full or the vertex is out of range.
  • nonnegative integer – this vertex is now guaranteed to be in the graph.

See also

  • add_vertex_unsafe – add a vertex to a graph. This method is potentially unsafe. You should instead use add_vertex().
  • add_vertices – add a bunch of vertices to a graph.

EXAMPLES:

Adding vertices to a sparse graph:

sage: from sage.graphs.base.sparse_graph import SparseGraph
sage: G = SparseGraph(3, extra_vertices=3)
sage: G.add_vertex(3)
3
sage: G.add_arc(2, 5)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
LookupError: Vertex (5) is not a vertex of the graph.
sage: G.add_arc(1, 3)
sage: G.has_arc(1, 3)
True
sage: G.has_arc(2, 3)
False

Adding vertices to a dense graph:

sage: from sage.graphs.base.dense_graph import DenseGraph
sage: G = DenseGraph(3, extra_vertices=3)
sage: G.add_vertex(3)
3
sage: G.add_arc(2,5)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
LookupError: Vertex (5) is not a vertex of the graph.
sage: G.add_arc(1, 3)
sage: G.has_arc(1, 3)
True
sage: G.has_arc(2, 3)
False

Repeatedly adding a vertex using \(k = -1\) will allocate more memory as required:

sage: from sage.graphs.base.sparse_graph import SparseGraph
sage: G = SparseGraph(3, extra_vertices=0)
sage: G.verts()
[0, 1, 2]
sage: for i in range(10):
...       _ = G.add_vertex(-1);
...
sage: G.verts()
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12]
sage: from sage.graphs.base.dense_graph import DenseGraph
sage: G = DenseGraph(3, extra_vertices=0)
sage: G.verts()
[0, 1, 2]
sage: for i in range(12):
...       _ = G.add_vertex(-1);
...
sage: G.verts()
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14]

TESTS:

sage: from sage.graphs.base.sparse_graph import SparseGraph
sage: G = SparseGraph(3, extra_vertices=0)
sage: G.add_vertex(6)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
RuntimeError: Requested vertex is past twice the allocated range: use realloc.
sage: from sage.graphs.base.dense_graph import DenseGraph
sage: G = DenseGraph(3, extra_vertices=0)
sage: G.add_vertex(6)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
RuntimeError: Requested vertex is past twice the allocated range: use realloc.
add_vertices(verts)

Adds vertices from the iterable verts.

INPUT:

  • verts – an iterable of vertices. Value -1 has a special meaning – for each such value an unused vertex name is found, used to create a new vertex and returned.

OUTPUT:

List of generated labels if there is any -1 in verts. None otherwise.

See also

EXAMPLE:

Adding vertices for sparse graphs:

sage: from sage.graphs.base.sparse_graph import SparseGraph
sage: S = SparseGraph(nverts=4, extra_vertices=4)
sage: S.verts()
[0, 1, 2, 3]
sage: S.add_vertices([3,-1,4,9])
[5]
sage: S.verts()
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9]
sage: S.realloc(20)
sage: S.verts()
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9]

Adding vertices for dense graphs:

sage: from sage.graphs.base.dense_graph import DenseGraph
sage: D = DenseGraph(nverts=4, extra_vertices=4)
sage: D.verts()
[0, 1, 2, 3]
sage: D.add_vertices([3,-1,4,9])
[5]
sage: D.verts()
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9]
sage: D.realloc(20)
sage: D.verts()
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9]
all_arcs(u, v)

Return the labels of all arcs from u to v.

INPUT:

  • u – integer; the tail of an arc.
  • v – integer; the head of an arc.

OUTPUT:

  • Raise NotImplementedError. This method is not implemented at the CGraph level. A child class should provide a suitable implementation.

See also

  • all_arcsall_arcs method for sparse graphs.

EXAMPLE:

sage: from sage.graphs.base.c_graph import CGraph
sage: G = CGraph()
sage: G.all_arcs(0, 1)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
NotImplementedError
check_vertex(n)

Checks that n is a vertex of self.

This method is different from has_vertex(). The current method raises an error if n is not a vertex of this graph. On the other hand, has_vertex() returns a boolean to signify whether or not n is a vertex of this graph.

INPUT:

  • n – a nonnegative integer representing a vertex.

OUTPUT:

  • Raise an error if n is not a vertex of this graph.

See also

  • has_vertex() – determine whether this graph has a specific vertex.

EXAMPLES:

sage: from sage.graphs.base.sparse_graph import SparseGraph
sage: S = SparseGraph(nverts=10, expected_degree=3, extra_vertices=10)
sage: S.check_vertex(4)
sage: S.check_vertex(12)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
LookupError: Vertex (12) is not a vertex of the graph.
sage: S.check_vertex(24)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
LookupError: Vertex (24) is not a vertex of the graph.
sage: S.check_vertex(-19)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
LookupError: Vertex (-19) is not a vertex of the graph.
sage: from sage.graphs.base.dense_graph import DenseGraph
sage: D = DenseGraph(nverts=10, extra_vertices=10)
sage: D.check_vertex(4)
sage: D.check_vertex(12)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
LookupError: Vertex (12) is not a vertex of the graph.
sage: D.check_vertex(24)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
LookupError: Vertex (24) is not a vertex of the graph.
sage: D.check_vertex(-19)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
LookupError: Vertex (-19) is not a vertex of the graph.
current_allocation()

Report the number of vertices allocated.

INPUT:

  • None.

OUTPUT:

  • The number of vertices allocated. This number is usually different from the order of a graph. We may have allocated enough memory for a graph to hold \(n > 0\) vertices, but the order (actual number of vertices) of the graph could be less than \(n\).

EXAMPLES:

sage: from sage.graphs.base.sparse_graph import SparseGraph
sage: S = SparseGraph(nverts=4, extra_vertices=4)
sage: S.current_allocation()
8
sage: S.add_vertex(6)
6
sage: S.current_allocation()
8
sage: S.add_vertex(10)
10
sage: S.current_allocation()
16
sage: S.add_vertex(40)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
RuntimeError: Requested vertex is past twice the allocated range: use realloc.
sage: S.realloc(50)
sage: S.add_vertex(40)
40
sage: S.current_allocation()
50
sage: S.realloc(30)
-1
sage: S.current_allocation()
50
sage: S.del_vertex(40)
sage: S.realloc(30)
sage: S.current_allocation()
30

The actual number of vertices in a graph might be less than the number of vertices allocated for the graph:

sage: from sage.graphs.base.dense_graph import DenseGraph
sage: G = DenseGraph(nverts=3, extra_vertices=2)
sage: order = len(G.verts())
sage: order
3
sage: G.current_allocation()
5
sage: order < G.current_allocation()
True
del_all_arcs(u, v)

Delete all arcs from u to v.

INPUT:

  • u – integer; the tail of an arc.
  • v – integer; the head of an arc.

OUTPUT:

  • Raise NotImplementedError. This method is not implemented at the CGraph level. A child class should provide a suitable implementation.

See also

EXAMPLE:

sage: from sage.graphs.base.c_graph import CGraph
sage: G = CGraph()
sage: G.del_all_arcs(0,1)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
NotImplementedError
del_vertex(v)

Deletes the vertex v, along with all edges incident to it. If v is not in self, fails silently.

INPUT:

  • v – a nonnegative integer representing a vertex.

OUTPUT:

  • None.

See also

  • del_vertex_unsafe – delete a vertex from a graph. This method is potentially unsafe. Use del_vertex() instead.

EXAMPLES:

Deleting vertices of sparse graphs:

sage: from sage.graphs.base.sparse_graph import SparseGraph
sage: G = SparseGraph(3)
sage: G.add_arc(0, 1)
sage: G.add_arc(0, 2)
sage: G.add_arc(1, 2)
sage: G.add_arc(2, 0)
sage: G.del_vertex(2)
sage: for i in range(2):
...       for j in range(2):
...           if G.has_arc(i, j):
...               print i, j
0 1
sage: G = SparseGraph(3)
sage: G.add_arc(0, 1)
sage: G.add_arc(0, 2)
sage: G.add_arc(1, 2)
sage: G.add_arc(2, 0)
sage: G.del_vertex(1)
sage: for i in xrange(3):
...       for j in xrange(3):
...           if G.has_arc(i, j):
...               print i, j
0 2
2 0

Deleting vertices of dense graphs:

sage: from sage.graphs.base.dense_graph import DenseGraph
sage: G = DenseGraph(4)
sage: G.add_arc(0, 1); G.add_arc(0, 2)
sage: G.add_arc(3, 1); G.add_arc(3, 2)
sage: G.add_arc(1, 2)
sage: G.verts()
[0, 1, 2, 3]
sage: G.del_vertex(3); G.verts()
[0, 1, 2]
sage: for i in range(3):
...       for j in range(3):
...           if G.has_arc(i, j):
...               print i, j
...
0 1
0 2
1 2

If the vertex to be deleted is not in this graph, then fail silently:

sage: from sage.graphs.base.sparse_graph import SparseGraph
sage: G = SparseGraph(3)
sage: G.verts()
[0, 1, 2]
sage: G.has_vertex(3)
False
sage: G.del_vertex(3)
sage: G.verts()
[0, 1, 2]
sage: from sage.graphs.base.dense_graph import DenseGraph
sage: G = DenseGraph(5)
sage: G.verts()
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4]
sage: G.has_vertex(6)
False
sage: G.del_vertex(6)
sage: G.verts()
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4]
has_arc(u, v)

Determine whether or not the given arc is in this graph.

INPUT:

  • u – integer; the tail of an arc.
  • v – integer; the head of an arc.

OUTPUT:

  • Print a Not Implemented! message. This method is not implemented at the CGraph level. A child class should provide a suitable implementation.

See also

  • has_archas_arc method for sparse graphs.
  • has_archas_arc method for dense graphs.

EXAMPLE:

sage: from sage.graphs.base.c_graph import CGraph
sage: G = CGraph()
sage: G.has_arc(0, 1)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
NotImplementedError
has_vertex(n)

Determine whether the vertex n is in self.

This method is different from check_vertex(). The current method returns a boolean to signify whether or not n is a vertex of this graph. On the other hand, check_vertex() raises an error if n is not a vertex of this graph.

INPUT:

  • n – a nonnegative integer representing a vertex.

OUTPUT:

  • True if n is a vertex of this graph; False otherwise.

See also

  • check_vertex() – raise an error if this graph does not contain a specific vertex.

EXAMPLES:

Upon initialization, a SparseGraph or DenseGraph has the first nverts vertices:

sage: from sage.graphs.base.sparse_graph import SparseGraph
sage: S = SparseGraph(nverts=10, expected_degree=3, extra_vertices=10)
sage: S.has_vertex(6)
True
sage: S.has_vertex(12)
False
sage: S.has_vertex(24)
False
sage: S.has_vertex(-19)
False
sage: from sage.graphs.base.dense_graph import DenseGraph
sage: D = DenseGraph(nverts=10, extra_vertices=10)
sage: D.has_vertex(6)
True
sage: D.has_vertex(12)
False
sage: D.has_vertex(24)
False
sage: D.has_vertex(-19)
False
in_neighbors(v)

Gives the in-neighbors of the vertex v.

INPUT:

  • v – integer representing a vertex of this graph.

OUTPUT:

  • Raise NotImplementedError. This method is not implemented at the CGraph level. A child class should provide a suitable implementation.

See also

EXAMPLE:

sage: from sage.graphs.base.c_graph import CGraph
sage: G = CGraph()
sage: G.in_neighbors(0)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
NotImplementedError
out_neighbors(u)

Gives the out-neighbors of the vertex u.

INPUT:

  • u – integer representing a vertex of this graph.

OUTPUT:

  • Raise NotImplementedError. This method is not implemented at the CGraph level. A child class should provide a suitable implementation.

See also

  • out_neighborsout_neighbors implementation for sparse graphs.
  • out_neighborsout_neighbors implementation for dense graphs.

EXAMPLE:

sage: from sage.graphs.base.c_graph import CGraph
sage: G = CGraph()
sage: G.out_neighbors(0)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
NotImplementedError
realloc(total)

Reallocate the number of vertices to use, without actually adding any.

INPUT:

  • total – integer; the total size to make the array of vertices.

OUTPUT:

  • Raise a NotImplementedError. This method is not implemented in this base class. A child class should provide a suitable implementation.

See also

  • realloc – a realloc implementation for sparse graphs.
  • realloc – a realloc implementation for dense graphs.

EXAMPLES:

First, note that realloc() is implemented for SparseGraph and DenseGraph differently, and is not implemented at the CGraph level:

sage: from sage.graphs.base.c_graph import CGraph
sage: G = CGraph()
sage: G.realloc(20)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
NotImplementedError

The realloc implementation for sparse graphs:

sage: from sage.graphs.base.sparse_graph import SparseGraph
sage: S = SparseGraph(nverts=4, extra_vertices=4)
sage: S.current_allocation()
8
sage: S.add_vertex(6)
6
sage: S.current_allocation()
8
sage: S.add_vertex(10)
10
sage: S.current_allocation()
16
sage: S.add_vertex(40)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
RuntimeError: Requested vertex is past twice the allocated range: use realloc.
sage: S.realloc(50)
sage: S.add_vertex(40)
40
sage: S.current_allocation()
50
sage: S.realloc(30)
-1
sage: S.current_allocation()
50
sage: S.del_vertex(40)
sage: S.realloc(30)
sage: S.current_allocation()
30

The realloc implementation for dense graphs:

sage: from sage.graphs.base.dense_graph import DenseGraph
sage: D = DenseGraph(nverts=4, extra_vertices=4)
sage: D.current_allocation()
8
sage: D.add_vertex(6)
6
sage: D.current_allocation()
8
sage: D.add_vertex(10)
10
sage: D.current_allocation()
16
sage: D.add_vertex(40)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
RuntimeError: Requested vertex is past twice the allocated range: use realloc.
sage: D.realloc(50)
sage: D.add_vertex(40)
40
sage: D.current_allocation()
50
sage: D.realloc(30)
-1
sage: D.current_allocation()
50
sage: D.del_vertex(40)
sage: D.realloc(30)
sage: D.current_allocation()
30
verts()

Returns a list of the vertices in self.

INPUT:

  • None.

OUTPUT:

  • A list of all vertices in this graph.

EXAMPLE:

sage: from sage.graphs.base.sparse_graph import SparseGraph
sage: S = SparseGraph(nverts=4, extra_vertices=4)
sage: S.verts()
[0, 1, 2, 3]
sage: S.add_vertices([3,5,7,9])
sage: S.verts()
[0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 9]
sage: S.realloc(20)
sage: S.verts()
[0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 9]
sage: from sage.graphs.base.dense_graph import DenseGraph
sage: G = DenseGraph(3, extra_vertices=2)
sage: G.verts()
[0, 1, 2]
sage: G.del_vertex(0)
sage: G.verts()
[1, 2]
class sage.graphs.base.c_graph.CGraphBackend

Bases: sage.graphs.base.graph_backends.GenericGraphBackend

Base class for sparse and dense graph backends.

sage: from sage.graphs.base.c_graph import CGraphBackend

This class is extended by SparseGraphBackend and DenseGraphBackend, which are fully functional backends. This class is mainly just for vertex functions, which are the same for both. A CGraphBackend will not work on its own:

sage: from sage.graphs.base.c_graph import CGraphBackend
sage: CGB = CGraphBackend()
sage: CGB.degree(0, True)
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
AttributeError: 'CGraphBackend' object has no attribute 'vertex_ints'

The appropriate way to use these backends is via Sage graphs:

sage: G = Graph(30, implementation="c_graph")
sage: G.add_edges([(0,1), (0,3), (4,5), (9, 23)])
sage: G.edges(labels=False)
[(0, 1), (0, 3), (4, 5), (9, 23)]

See also

add_vertex(name)

Add a vertex to self.

INPUT:

  • name – the vertex to be added (must be hashable). If None, a new name is created.

OUTPUT:

  • If name=None, the new vertex name is returned. None otherwise.

See also

  • add_vertices() – add a bunch of vertices of this graph.
  • has_vertex() – returns whether or not this graph has a specific vertex.

EXAMPLE:

sage: D = sage.graphs.base.dense_graph.DenseGraphBackend(9)
sage: D.add_vertex(10)
sage: D.add_vertex([])
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
TypeError: unhashable type: 'list'
sage: S = sage.graphs.base.sparse_graph.SparseGraphBackend(9)
sage: S.add_vertex(10)
sage: S.add_vertex([])
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
TypeError: unhashable type: 'list'
add_vertices(vertices)

Add vertices to self.

INPUT:

  • vertices: iterator of vertex labels. A new name is created, used and returned in the output list for all None values in vertices.

OUTPUT:

Generated names of new vertices if there is at least one None value present in vertices. None otherwise.

See also

EXAMPLE:

sage: D = sage.graphs.base.sparse_graph.SparseGraphBackend(1)
sage: D.add_vertices([1,2,3])
sage: D.add_vertices([None]*4)
[4, 5, 6, 7]
sage: G = sage.graphs.base.sparse_graph.SparseGraphBackend(0)
sage: G.add_vertices([0,1])
sage: list(G.iterator_verts(None))
[0, 1]
sage: list(G.iterator_edges([0,1], True))
[]
sage: import sage.graphs.base.dense_graph
sage: D = sage.graphs.base.dense_graph.DenseGraphBackend(9)
sage: D.add_vertices([10,11,12])
bidirectional_dijkstra(x, y)

Returns the shortest path between x and y using a bidirectional version of Dijkstra’s algorithm.

INPUT:

  • x – the starting vertex in the shortest path from x to y.
  • y – the end vertex in the shortest path from x to y.

OUTPUT:

  • A list of vertices in the shortest path from x to y.

EXAMPLE:

sage: G = Graph(graphs.PetersenGraph(), implementation="c_graph")
sage: for (u,v) in G.edges(labels=None):
...      G.set_edge_label(u,v,1)
sage: G.shortest_path(0, 1, by_weight=True)
[0, 1]

TEST:

Bugfix from #7673

sage: G = Graph(implementation="networkx")
sage: G.add_edges([(0,1,9),(0,2,8),(1,2,7)])
sage: Gc = G.copy(implementation='c_graph')
sage: sp = G.shortest_path_length(0,1,by_weight=True)
sage: spc = Gc.shortest_path_length(0,1,by_weight=True)
sage: sp == spc
True

Returns a breadth-first search from vertex v.

INPUT:

  • v – a vertex from which to start the breadth-first search.
  • reverse – boolean (default: False). This is only relevant to digraphs. If this is a digraph, consider the reversed graph in which the out-neighbors become the in-neighbors and vice versa.
  • ignore_direction – boolean (default: False). This is only relevant to digraphs. If this is a digraph, ignore all orientations and consider the graph as undirected.

ALGORITHM:

Below is a general template for breadth-first search.

  • Input: A directed or undirected graph \(G = (V, E)\) of order \(n > 0\). A vertex \(s\) from which to start the search. The vertices are numbered from 1 to \(n = |V|\), i.e. \(V = \{1, 2, \dots, n\}\).
  • Output: A list \(D\) of distances of all vertices from \(s\). A tree \(T\) rooted at \(s\).
  1. \(Q \leftarrow [s]\) # a queue of nodes to visit
  2. \(D \leftarrow [\infty, \infty, \dots, \infty]\) # \(n\) copies of \(\infty\)
  3. \(D[s] \leftarrow 0\)
  4. \(T \leftarrow [\,]\)
  5. while \(\text{length}(Q) > 0\) do
    1. \(v \leftarrow \text{dequeue}(Q)\)
    2. for each \(w \in \text{adj}(v)\) do # for digraphs, use out-neighbor set \(\text{oadj}(v)\)
      1. if \(D[w] = \infty\) then
        1. \(D[w] \leftarrow D[v] + 1\)
        2. \(\text{enqueue}(Q, w)\)
        3. \(\text{append}(T, vw)\)
  6. return \((D, T)\)

See also

EXAMPLES:

Breadth-first search of the Petersen graph starting at vertex 0:

sage: G = Graph(graphs.PetersenGraph(), implementation="c_graph")
sage: list(G.breadth_first_search(0))
[0, 1, 4, 5, 2, 6, 3, 9, 7, 8]

Visiting German cities using breadth-first search:

sage: G = Graph({"Mannheim": ["Frankfurt","Karlsruhe"],
...   "Frankfurt": ["Mannheim","Wurzburg","Kassel"],
...   "Kassel": ["Frankfurt","Munchen"],
...   "Munchen": ["Kassel","Nurnberg","Augsburg"],
...   "Augsburg": ["Munchen","Karlsruhe"],
...   "Karlsruhe": ["Mannheim","Augsburg"],
...   "Wurzburg": ["Frankfurt","Erfurt","Nurnberg"],
...   "Nurnberg": ["Wurzburg","Stuttgart","Munchen"],
...   "Stuttgart": ["Nurnberg"],
...   "Erfurt": ["Wurzburg"]}, implementation="c_graph")
sage: list(G.breadth_first_search("Frankfurt"))
['Frankfurt', 'Mannheim', 'Kassel', 'Wurzburg', 'Karlsruhe', 'Munchen', 'Erfurt', 'Nurnberg', 'Augsburg', 'Stuttgart']
degree(v, directed)

Return the degree of the vertex v.

INPUT:

  • v – a vertex of the graph.
  • directed – boolean; whether to take into account the orientation of this graph in counting the degree of v.

OUTPUT:

  • The degree of vertex v.

EXAMPLE:

sage: from sage.graphs.base.sparse_graph import SparseGraphBackend
sage: B = SparseGraphBackend(7)
sage: B.degree(3, False)
0

TESTS:

Ensure that ticket trac ticket #8395 is fixed.

sage: def my_add_edges(G, m, n):
...       for i in range(m):
...           u = randint(0, n)
...           v = randint(0, n)
...           G.add_edge(u, v)
sage: G = Graph({1:[1]}); G
Looped graph on 1 vertex
sage: G.edges(labels=False)
[(1, 1)]
sage: G.degree(); G.size()
[2]
1
sage: sum(G.degree()) == 2 * G.size()
True
sage: G = Graph({1:[1,2], 2:[2,3]}, loops=True); G
Looped graph on 3 vertices
sage: my_add_edges(G, 100, 50)
sage: sum(G.degree()) == 2 * G.size()
True
sage: G = Graph({1:[2,2], 2:[3]}); G
Multi-graph on 3 vertices
sage: G.edges(labels=False)
[(1, 2), (1, 2), (2, 3)]
sage: G.degree(); G.size()
[2, 3, 1]
3
sage: sum(G.degree()) == 2 * G.size()
True
sage: G.allow_loops(True); G
Looped multi-graph on 3 vertices
sage: my_add_edges(G, 100, 50)
sage: sum(G.degree()) == 2 * G.size()
True
sage: D = DiGraph({1:[2], 2:[1,3]}); D
Digraph on 3 vertices
sage: D.edges(labels=False)
[(1, 2), (2, 1), (2, 3)]
sage: D.degree(); D.size()
[2, 3, 1]
3
sage: sum(D.degree()) == 2 * D.size()
True
sage: D.allow_loops(True); D
Looped digraph on 3 vertices
sage: my_add_edges(D, 100, 50)
sage: sum(D.degree()) == 2 * D.size()
True
sage: D.allow_multiple_edges(True)
sage: my_add_edges(D, 200, 50)
sage: sum(D.degree()) == 2 * D.size()
True
sage: G = Graph({1:[2,2,2]})
sage: G.allow_loops(True)
sage: G.add_edge(1,1)
sage: G.add_edge(1,1)
sage: G.edges(labels=False)
[(1, 1), (1, 1), (1, 2), (1, 2), (1, 2)]
sage: G.degree(1)
7
sage: G.allow_loops(False)
sage: G.edges(labels=False)
[(1, 2), (1, 2), (1, 2)]
sage: G.degree(1)
3
sage: G = Graph({1:{2:['a','a','a']}})
sage: G.allow_loops(True)
sage: G.add_edge(1,1,'b')
sage: G.add_edge(1,1,'b')
sage: G.add_edge(1,1)
sage: G.add_edge(1,1)
sage: G.edges()
[(1, 1, None), (1, 1, None), (1, 1, 'b'), (1, 1, 'b'), (1, 2, 'a'), (1, 2, 'a'), (1, 2, 'a')]
sage: G.degree(1)
11
sage: G.allow_loops(False)
sage: G.edges()
[(1, 2, 'a'), (1, 2, 'a'), (1, 2, 'a')]
sage: G.degree(1)
3
sage: G = Graph({1:{2:['a','a','a']}})
sage: G.allow_loops(True)
sage: G.add_edge(1,1,'b')
sage: G.add_edge(1,1,'b')
sage: G.edges()
[(1, 1, 'b'), (1, 1, 'b'), (1, 2, 'a'), (1, 2, 'a'), (1, 2, 'a')]
sage: G.degree(1)
7
sage: G.allow_loops(False)
sage: G.edges()
[(1, 2, 'a'), (1, 2, 'a'), (1, 2, 'a')]
sage: G.degree(1)
3

Ensure that trac ticket #13664 is fixed

sage: W = WeylGroup(["A",1])
sage: G = W.cayley_graph()
sage: Graph(G).degree()
[1, 1]
sage: h = Graph()
sage: h.add_edge(1,2,"a")
sage: h.add_edge(1,2,"a")
sage: h.degree()
[1, 1]
del_vertex(v)

Delete a vertex in self, failing silently if the vertex is not in the graph.

INPUT:

  • v – vertex to be deleted.

OUTPUT:

  • None.

See also

EXAMPLE:

sage: D = sage.graphs.base.dense_graph.DenseGraphBackend(9)
sage: D.del_vertex(0)
sage: D.has_vertex(0)
False
sage: S = sage.graphs.base.sparse_graph.SparseGraphBackend(9)
sage: S.del_vertex(0)
sage: S.has_vertex(0)
False
del_vertices(vertices)

Delete vertices from an iterable container.

INPUT:

  • vertices – iterator of vertex labels.

OUTPUT:

See also

EXAMPLE:

sage: import sage.graphs.base.dense_graph
sage: D = sage.graphs.base.dense_graph.DenseGraphBackend(9)
sage: D.del_vertices([7,8])
sage: D.has_vertex(7)
False
sage: D.has_vertex(6)
True
sage: D = sage.graphs.base.sparse_graph.SparseGraphBackend(9)
sage: D.del_vertices([1,2,3])
sage: D.has_vertex(1)
False
sage: D.has_vertex(0)
True

Returns a depth-first search from vertex v.

INPUT:

  • v – a vertex from which to start the depth-first search.
  • reverse – boolean (default: False). This is only relevant to digraphs. If this is a digraph, consider the reversed graph in which the out-neighbors become the in-neighbors and vice versa.
  • ignore_direction – boolean (default: False). This is only relevant to digraphs. If this is a digraph, ignore all orientations and consider the graph as undirected.

ALGORITHM:

Below is a general template for depth-first search.

  • Input: A directed or undirected graph \(G = (V, E)\) of order \(n > 0\). A vertex \(s\) from which to start the search. The vertices are numbered from 1 to \(n = |V|\), i.e. \(V = \{1, 2, \dots, n\}\).
  • Output: A list \(D\) of distances of all vertices from \(s\). A tree \(T\) rooted at \(s\).
  1. \(S \leftarrow [s]\) # a stack of nodes to visit
  2. \(D \leftarrow [\infty, \infty, \dots, \infty]\) # \(n\) copies of \(\infty\)
  3. \(D[s] \leftarrow 0\)
  4. \(T \leftarrow [\,]\)
  5. while \(\text{length}(S) > 0\) do
    1. \(v \leftarrow \text{pop}(S)\)
    2. for each \(w \in \text{adj}(v)\) do # for digraphs, use out-neighbor set \(\text{oadj}(v)\)
      1. if \(D[w] = \infty\) then
        1. \(D[w] \leftarrow D[v] + 1\)
        2. \(\text{push}(S, w)\)
        3. \(\text{append}(T, vw)\)
  6. return \((D, T)\)

See also

EXAMPLES:

Traversing the Petersen graph using depth-first search:

sage: G = Graph(graphs.PetersenGraph(), implementation="c_graph")
sage: list(G.depth_first_search(0))
[0, 5, 8, 6, 9, 7, 2, 3, 4, 1]

Visiting German cities using depth-first search:

sage: G = Graph({"Mannheim": ["Frankfurt","Karlsruhe"],
...   "Frankfurt": ["Mannheim","Wurzburg","Kassel"],
...   "Kassel": ["Frankfurt","Munchen"],
...   "Munchen": ["Kassel","Nurnberg","Augsburg"],
...   "Augsburg": ["Munchen","Karlsruhe"],
...   "Karlsruhe": ["Mannheim","Augsburg"],
...   "Wurzburg": ["Frankfurt","Erfurt","Nurnberg"],
...   "Nurnberg": ["Wurzburg","Stuttgart","Munchen"],
...   "Stuttgart": ["Nurnberg"],
...   "Erfurt": ["Wurzburg"]}, implementation="c_graph")
sage: list(G.depth_first_search("Frankfurt"))
['Frankfurt', 'Wurzburg', 'Nurnberg', 'Munchen', 'Kassel', 'Augsburg', 'Karlsruhe', 'Mannheim', 'Stuttgart', 'Erfurt']
has_vertex(v)

Returns whether v is a vertex of self.

INPUT:

  • v – any object.

OUTPUT:

  • True if v is a vertex of this graph; False otherwise.

EXAMPLE:

sage: from sage.graphs.base.sparse_graph import SparseGraphBackend
sage: B = SparseGraphBackend(7)
sage: B.has_vertex(6)
True
sage: B.has_vertex(7)
False
in_degree(v)

Returns the in-degree of v

INPUT:

  • v – a vertex of the graph.

EXAMPLE:

sage: D = DiGraph( { 0: [1,2,3], 1: [0,2], 2: [3], 3: [4], 4: [0,5], 5: [1] } )
sage: D.out_degree(1)
2
is_connected()

Returns whether the graph is connected.

EXAMPLES:

Petersen’s graph is connected:

sage: DiGraph(graphs.PetersenGraph(),implementation="c_graph").is_connected()
True

While the disjoint union of two of them is not:

sage: DiGraph(2*graphs.PetersenGraph(),implementation="c_graph").is_connected()
False

A graph with non-integer vertex labels:

sage: Graph(graphs.CubeGraph(3), implementation='c_graph').is_connected()
True
is_directed_acyclic(certificate=False)

Returns whether the graph is both directed and acylic (possibly with a certificate)

INPUT:

  • certificate – whether to return a certificate (False by default).

OUTPUT:

When certificate=False, returns a boolean value. When certificate=True :

  • If the graph is acyclic, returns a pair (True, ordering) where ordering is a list of the vertices such that u appears before v in ordering if u, v is an edge.
  • Else, returns a pair (False, cycle) where cycle is a list of vertices representing a circuit in the graph.

ALGORITHM:

We pick a vertex at random, think hard and find out that that if we are to remove the vertex from the graph we must remove all of its out-neighbors in the first place. So we put all of its out-neighbours in a stack, and repeat the same procedure with the vertex on top of the stack (when a vertex on top of the stack has no out-neighbors, we remove it immediately). Of course, for each vertex we only add its outneighbors to the end of the stack once : if for some reason the previous algorithm leads us to do it twice, it means we have found a circuit.

We keep track of the vertices whose out-neighborhood has been added to the stack once with a variable named tried.

There is no reason why the graph should be empty at the end of this procedure, so we run it again on the remaining vertices until none are left or a circuit is found.

Note

The graph is assumed to be directed. An exception is raised if it is not.

EXAMPLES:

At first, the following graph is acyclic:

sage: D = DiGraph({ 0:[1,2,3], 4:[2,5], 1:[8], 2:[7], 3:[7], 5:[6,7], 7:[8], 6:[9], 8:[10], 9:[10] })
sage: D.plot(layout='circular').show()
sage: D.is_directed_acyclic()
True

Adding an edge from \(9\) to \(7\) does not change it:

sage: D.add_edge(9,7)
sage: D.is_directed_acyclic()
True

We can obtain as a proof an ordering of the vertices such that \(u\) appears before \(v\) if \(uv\) is an edge of the graph:

sage: D.is_directed_acyclic(certificate = True)
(True, [4, 5, 6, 9, 0, 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 10])

Adding an edge from 7 to 4, though, makes a difference:

sage: D.add_edge(7,4)
sage: D.is_directed_acyclic()
False

Indeed, it creates a circuit \(7, 4, 5\):

sage: D.is_directed_acyclic(certificate = True)
(False, [7, 4, 5])

Checking acyclic graphs are indeed acyclic

sage: def random_acyclic(n, p):
...    g = graphs.RandomGNP(n, p)
...    h = DiGraph()
...    h.add_edges([ ((u,v) if u<v else (v,u)) for u,v,_ in g.edges() ])
...    return h
...
sage: all( random_acyclic(100, .2).is_directed_acyclic()    # long time
...        for i in range(50))                              # long time
True
is_strongly_connected()

Returns whether the graph is strongly connected.

EXAMPLES:

The circuit on 3 vertices is obviously strongly connected:

sage: g = DiGraph({0: [1], 1: [2], 2: [0]}, implementation="c_graph")
sage: g.is_strongly_connected()
True

But a transitive triangle is not:

sage: g = DiGraph({0: [1,2], 1: [2]}, implementation="c_graph")
sage: g.is_strongly_connected()
False
iterator_in_nbrs(v)

Returns an iterator over the incoming neighbors of v.

INPUT:

  • v – a vertex of this graph.

OUTPUT:

  • An iterator over the in-neighbors of the vertex v.

See also

EXAMPLE:

sage: P = DiGraph(graphs.PetersenGraph().to_directed(), implementation="c_graph")
sage: list(P._backend.iterator_in_nbrs(0))
[1, 4, 5]
iterator_nbrs(v)

Returns an iterator over the neighbors of v.

INPUT:

  • v – a vertex of this graph.

OUTPUT:

  • An iterator over the neighbors the vertex v.

See also

EXAMPLE:

sage: P = Graph(graphs.PetersenGraph(), implementation="c_graph")
sage: list(P._backend.iterator_nbrs(0))
[1, 4, 5]
iterator_out_nbrs(v)

Returns an iterator over the outgoing neighbors of v.

INPUT:

  • v – a vertex of this graph.

OUTPUT:

  • An iterator over the out-neighbors of the vertex v.

See also

EXAMPLE:

sage: P = DiGraph(graphs.PetersenGraph().to_directed(), implementation="c_graph")
sage: list(P._backend.iterator_out_nbrs(0))
[1, 4, 5]
iterator_verts(verts=None)

Returns an iterator over the vertices of self intersected with verts.

INPUT:

  • verts – an iterable container of objects (default: None).

OUTPUT:

  • If verts=None, return an iterator over all vertices of this graph.
  • If verts is an iterable container of vertices, find the intersection of verts with the vertex set of this graph and return an iterator over the resulting intersection.

See also

EXAMPLE:

sage: P = Graph(graphs.PetersenGraph(), implementation="c_graph")
sage: list(P._backend.iterator_verts(P))
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
sage: list(P._backend.iterator_verts())
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
sage: list(P._backend.iterator_verts([1, 2, 3]))
[1, 2, 3]
sage: list(P._backend.iterator_verts([1, 2, 10]))
[1, 2]
loops(new=None)

Returns whether loops are allowed in this graph.

INPUT:

  • new – (default: None); boolean (to set) or None (to get).

OUTPUT:

  • If new=None, return True if this graph allows self-loops or False if self-loops are not allowed.
  • If new is a boolean, set the self-loop permission of this graph according to the boolean value of new.

EXAMPLE:

sage: G = Graph(implementation='c_graph')
sage: G._backend.loops()
False
sage: G._backend.loops(True)
sage: G._backend.loops()
True
num_edges(directed)

Returns the number of edges in self.

INPUT:

  • directed – boolean; whether to count (u,v) and (v,u) as one or two edges.

OUTPUT:

  • If directed=True, counts the number of directed edges in this graph. Otherwise, return the size of this graph.

See also

EXAMPLE:

sage: G = Graph(graphs.PetersenGraph(), implementation="c_graph")
sage: G._backend.num_edges(False)
15

TESTS:

Ensure that ticket #8395 is fixed.

sage: G = Graph({1:[1]}); G
Looped graph on 1 vertex
sage: G.edges(labels=False)
[(1, 1)]
sage: G.size()
1
sage: G = Graph({1:[2,2]}); G
Multi-graph on 2 vertices
sage: G.edges(labels=False)
[(1, 2), (1, 2)]
sage: G.size()
2
sage: G = Graph({1:[1,1]}); G
Looped multi-graph on 1 vertex
sage: G.edges(labels=False)
[(1, 1), (1, 1)]
sage: G.size()
2
sage: D = DiGraph({1:[1]}); D
Looped digraph on 1 vertex
sage: D.edges(labels=False)
[(1, 1)]
sage: D.size()
1
sage: D = DiGraph({1:[2,2], 2:[1,1]}); D
Multi-digraph on 2 vertices
sage: D.edges(labels=False)
[(1, 2), (1, 2), (2, 1), (2, 1)]
sage: D.size()
4
sage: D = DiGraph({1:[1,1]}); D
Looped multi-digraph on 1 vertex
sage: D.edges(labels=False)
[(1, 1), (1, 1)]
sage: D.size()
2
sage: from sage.graphs.base.sparse_graph import SparseGraphBackend
sage: S = SparseGraphBackend(7)
sage: S.num_edges(directed=False)
0
sage: S.loops(True)
sage: S.add_edge(1, 1, None, directed=False)
sage: S.num_edges(directed=False)
1
sage: S.multiple_edges(True)
sage: S.add_edge(1, 1, None, directed=False)
sage: S.num_edges(directed=False)
2
sage: from sage.graphs.base.dense_graph import DenseGraphBackend
sage: D = DenseGraphBackend(7)
sage: D.num_edges(directed=False)
0
sage: D.loops(True)
sage: D.add_edge(1, 1, None, directed=False)
sage: D.num_edges(directed=False)
1
num_verts()

Returns the number of vertices in self.

INPUT:

  • None.

OUTPUT:

  • The order of this graph.

See also

  • num_edges() – return the number of (directed) edges in this graph.

EXAMPLE:

sage: G = Graph(graphs.PetersenGraph(), implementation="c_graph")
sage: G._backend.num_verts()
10
out_degree(v)

Returns the out-degree of v

INPUT:

  • v – a vertex of the graph.

EXAMPLE:

sage: D = DiGraph( { 0: [1,2,3], 1: [0,2], 2: [3], 3: [4], 4: [0,5], 5: [1] } )
sage: D.out_degree(1)
2
relabel(perm, directed)

Relabels the graph according to perm.

INPUT:

  • perm – anything which represents a permutation as v --> perm[v], for example a dict or a list.
  • directed – ignored (this is here for compatibility with other backends).

EXAMPLES:

sage: G = Graph(graphs.PetersenGraph(), implementation="c_graph")
sage: G._backend.relabel(range(9,-1,-1), False)
sage: G.edges()
[(0, 2, None),
 (0, 3, None),
 (0, 5, None),
 (1, 3, None),
 (1, 4, None),
 (1, 6, None),
 (2, 4, None),
 (2, 7, None),
 (3, 8, None),
 (4, 9, None),
 (5, 6, None),
 (5, 9, None),
 (6, 7, None),
 (7, 8, None),
 (8, 9, None)]
shortest_path(x, y)

Returns the shortest path between x and y.

INPUT:

  • x – the starting vertex in the shortest path from x to y.
  • y – the end vertex in the shortest path from x to y.

OUTPUT:

  • A list of vertices in the shortest path from x to y.

EXAMPLE:

sage: G = Graph(graphs.PetersenGraph(), implementation="c_graph")
sage: G.shortest_path(0, 1)
[0, 1]
shortest_path_all_vertices(v, cutoff=None)

Returns for each vertex u a shortest v-u path.

INPUT:

  • v – a starting vertex in the shortest path.
  • cutoff – maximal distance. Longer paths will not be returned.

OUTPUT:

  • A list which associates to each vertex u the shortest path between u and v if there is one.

Note

The weight of edges is not taken into account.

ALGORITHM:

This is just a breadth-first search.

EXAMPLES:

On the Petersen Graph:

sage: g = graphs.PetersenGraph()
sage: paths = g._backend.shortest_path_all_vertices(0)
sage: all([ len(paths[v]) == 0 or len(paths[v])-1 == g.distance(0,v) for v in g])
True

On a disconnected graph

sage: g = 2*graphs.RandomGNP(20,.3)
sage: paths = g._backend.shortest_path_all_vertices(0)
sage: all([ (v not in paths and g.distance(0,v) == +Infinity) or len(paths[v])-1 == g.distance(0,v) for v in g])
True
strongly_connected_component_containing_vertex(v)

Returns the strongly connected component containing the given vertex.

INPUT:

  • v – a vertex

EXAMPLES:

The digraph obtained from the PetersenGraph has an unique strongly connected component:

sage: g = DiGraph(graphs.PetersenGraph())
sage: g.strongly_connected_component_containing_vertex(0)
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

In the Butterfly DiGraph, each vertex is a strongly connected component:

sage: g = digraphs.ButterflyGraph(3)
sage: all([[v] == g.strongly_connected_component_containing_vertex(v) for v in g])
True
class sage.graphs.base.c_graph.Search_iterator

Bases: object

An iterator for traversing a (di)graph.

This class is commonly used to perform a depth-first or breadth-first search. The class does not build all at once in memory the whole list of visited vertices. The class maintains the following variables:

  • graph – a graph whose vertices are to be iterated over.
  • direction – integer; this determines the position at which vertices to be visited are removed from the list stack. For breadth-first search (BFS), element removal occurs at the start of the list, as signified by the value direction=0. This is because in implementations of BFS, the list of vertices to visit are usually maintained by a queue, so element insertion and removal follow a first-in first-out (FIFO) protocol. For depth-first search (DFS), element removal occurs at the end of the list, as signified by the value direction=-1. The reason is that DFS is usually implemented using a stack to maintain the list of vertices to visit. Hence, element insertion and removal follow a last-in first-out (LIFO) protocol.
  • stack – a list of vertices to visit.
  • seen – a list of vertices that are already visited.
  • test_out – boolean; whether we want to consider the out-neighbors of the graph to be traversed. For undirected graphs, we consider both the in- and out-neighbors. However, for digraphs we only traverse along out-neighbors.
  • test_in – boolean; whether we want to consider the in-neighbors of the graph to be traversed. For undirected graphs, we consider both the in- and out-neighbors.

EXAMPLE:

sage: g = graphs.PetersenGraph()
sage: list(g.breadth_first_search(0))
[0, 1, 4, 5, 2, 6, 3, 9, 7, 8]
next()

x.next() -> the next value, or raise StopIteration

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